...who wears the army 1902 pattern dress coat with brass "US" and crossed sabers cavalry badges on his collar. The crossed sabers device clearly bear the regimental number of "11"
above but the company of troop letter below is too indistinct to make out. On his left breast he wear his U.S. Army sharpshooters qualification badge while his branch of service cords -
in this case yellow for cavalry are draped across his chest from shoulder to shoulder. On his right breast he wears two medals.

While the photograph was heavily retouched by the photographer, the outside medal clearly is the Queen's South African Medal (QSAM) with four clasps. The United States Army (an
military as a whole) had only recently begun to issue campaign medal and there was nothing that even marginally resembled the QSAM in inventory so there is little doubt as to the
type of medal shown in the photograph. Next to the QSAM is what appears to be the 1902 Edward VII Coronation Medal. These medals leave little doubt that he spent more that a
little time serving in the filed with British forces prior to enlistment in the United States Cavalry.

His identity can only partially be made out by a faint inscription on the lower right hand corner of the photographs mount. It reads" Sincerely Yours, Francis ...", his last name being
more or less undecipherable. While trooper Francis may have formerly been a member of the regular British forces there is a possibility that he was a "colonial",  possibly Canadian
or Australian, as imperial contingents did take part in Edward VII coronation procession.

Below are two enhanced scans of the inscribed portion of the above photograph.

Mounted Photograph
6 Inches by 7 7/8 Inches
(15.2cm x 20cm)
Unknown American Photographer
United States
c. 1905
Above: Two enhanced gray scale scans of the photograph's inscription, While faint overall, that salutation
"Sincerely Yours" is easy enough to make out as is the first name of "Francis". There appears to be a middle
initial and the last name may begin with "G".