Lance Corporal John Nurse, 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) pictured with an unidentified
woman

Cabinet Photograph
Bayley & Murphy - Photographer
167 Hollis Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
c. 1890
No. 1846 Private John Nurse was born around 1868 at the town of Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire the son of William Furness.
He was employed as a collier when he enlisted with the West Riding Regiment at Halifax, West Riding, Yorkshire on 12 March,
1886. Nurse served some seven years with the colours with his postings as follows:

Home: 12 March, 1896 – 4 October, 1886
Bermuda: 5 October, 1886 – 21 September, 1888
Halifax, Nova Scotia: 22 September 1888 – 8 March, 1891
Barbados:  9 March 1891 – 23 March, 1893
Halifax, Nova Scotia: 24 March, 1893 – 12 April, 1893

Nurse was appointed Lance Corporal on 1st February, 1889 and promoted Corporal on 15 February, 1891 but was reduced to
Private on account of being absent without leave on 23 November, 1892. He would serve the remainder of his enlistment as a
Private. While with the colours he would earn a 2nd Class Certificate of Education. Private John Nurse would see no active
service in the field while serving with the Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment).

The woman Nurse is pictured with is unknown. His service records fail to mention a wife or any other family member other than
his father.
Colour Sergeant Henry Daniel Bance, 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

Cabinet Photograph
Bayley & Murphy - Photographer
167 Hollis Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
c. 1890
No. 1623 Colour Sergeant Henry Daniel Bance had a much more eventful military career when compared to that of Private
John Nurse.

Henry Daniel Bance was born on 25 January, 1866 at Lambeth, Surrey one of five children of Henry Daniel Bance Sr, and his
wife Eliza. The younger Bance was serving in the 4th Volunteer Battalion, The Middlesex Regiment when he enlisted with the
West Riding Regiment at Hounslow on 12 November, 1885. He was employed as a poultry man at the time although his father
was a boo
t maker by trade. Bance stood 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighed a mere 122 pounds.

Bance was appointed Lance Corporal on 30 June, 1888 and promoted Corporal on 16 August, 1890. Appointed Lance Sergeant
(unpaid) on 1 November, 1892, he received his promotion to Sergeant 26 August, 1893. He extended his service to complete 12
years on 20 July, 1894 and re-engaged to complete 21 years with the colours on 1 February, 1896. On the same date he was
posted as Sergeant to the 3rd Battalion, The Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment).Bance received 2nd, 3rd and 4th
Class Certificates of Education and attended Mounted Infantry School in 1894. His postings included:

Home: 12 November, 1885 – 4 October, 1886
Bermuda: 5 October, 1886 – 21 September 1888
Halifax, Nova Scotia: 22 September, 1888 – 9 March, 1891
West Indies: 10 March, 1891 – 2 April, 1893
South Africa: 3 April, 1893 – 31 January, 1897
Home: 1 February, 1897 – 26 February, 1900
South Africa: 27 February, 1900 – 10 May, 1902
Home: 11 May, 1902 – 31 March, 1904

Henry Daniel Bance took his discharge with pension at his own request on 31 March, 1904 after 18 years of service.
He saw active service in South Africa during the Matabele Campaign while volunteering  with the Bechuanaland  Border Police
(18 October, 1893 to 21 March, 1894) and again with the Matabeleland Relief Force (1 May, 1896 to 21 December, 1896). He
was entitled to the British South Africa Company’s Medal for Matabeleland with the clasp
“Rhodesia”. Bance returned South
Africa during the Anglo-Boer War and earned the Queen’s South Africa Medal with the clasp
“Cape Colony” and the King’s
South Africa Medal with the “
South Africa 1901” and “South Africa 1902” clasps.

During his first tour of duty in South Africa Bance married Miss Mary Ellen Dalton of Rondebosch, near Cape Town on 6
August, 1894. The Union produced at least two children; Mary Elizabeth, born at Pietermaritzburg, South Africa on 12 August,
1895 and Henry Daniel Bance III, born at Halifax, Yorkshire on 22 July, 1900.

Bance took up residence with his family at 1 Dartrey Terrace Kings Rd, Chelsea (his father’s home) after his discharge and
was listed as boot maker in the 1911 Census. Two additional sons were also mentioned here; Richard Earnest aged 5 and
Alexander Jordan aged 2.

Henry Daniel Bance rejoined the West Riding Regiment during World War One and then transferred to the Royal Air Force
with the rank of Company Sergeant Major. He was entitled to the 1914-1915 Star and the British War and Victory Medals.
Bance died on 10 February, 1920 while still serving and was buried at Woolwich Cemetery.

His records file contains an interesting series of letters from his widow to the West Riding Regiment and the Royal Air Force
(as well as correspondence between the two service branches) concerning the late Sergeant Major’s entitlement to the Long
Service & Good Conduct Medal.  Mrs. Bance seems to have sent in a request for the medal from her residence at 32 Little
Grey Street, Durban, Natal, South Africa on 10 November, 1925. The issue of Bance’s entitlement seemed to have been
settled in a letter dated 29th December, 1925 from the Infantry Records Office, Yorkshire stating that at the time Bance’s
“…character on discharge was not assessed as exemplary, which is a necessary qualification under existing regulations.”  
Bellow: While the following photographs where identified by the album owner, no additional information has come to light
regarding these soldier's service. Research is ongoing and any new information uncovered will be added as time permits.
Corporal Lambert of the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of
Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Carte de Visite
D.C. Furgusson - Photographer
Halifax, Nova Scotia
c. 1890
Corporal W. Lain of the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of
Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Carte de Visite
D.C. Furgusson - Photographer
Halifax, Nova Scotia
c. 1890
Corporal Humphries of the 2nd Battalion, The Duke
of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) - with his
plaster dog.

Carte de Visite
D.C. Furgusson - Photographer
Halifax, Nova Scotia
c. 1890
Private Brown of the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of
Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Cabinet Photograph
Bayley & Murphy - Photographer
167 Hollis Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia
c. 1890
Left: Although it is impossible to identify this soldier's battalion
or regiment it is assumed that he was also a member of the 2nd
Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)
since the photograph was found in the same album with the rest
of the above photographs. It is also impossible to guess this
man's rank. Of all the photo's the name written on the reverse is
also difficult to read. It appears to be Brundly or Brunley.

Cabinet Photograph
Bayley & Murphy - Photographer
167 Hollis Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia
c. 1890